Bravo Throttle Quadrant from Honeycomb Aeronautical

The New Bravo Throttle Quadrant from Honeycomb Aeronautical

Here’s something we rarely get to say: NEW FLIGHT CONTROLS! The new Bravo Throttle Quadrant from Honeycomb Aeronautical packs a ton of features and options into one affordable unit. It’s a sorely needed solution for the flight sim community.

Throttle Quadrant

First of all, the Bravo Throttle Quadrant recognizes something that the community has known for a long time: dudes dig jets. Therefore, the six main levers include interchangeable handles that include options for turbine airliners. That’s right – you can set up a Boeing 737 throttle quadrant right out of the box, including spoiler and flap lever. Furthermore, you can set it up as a four engine airliner, and I assume a three engine airliner for you B-727 or L-1011 enthusiasts out there.

General aviation pilots can set up the Bravo Throttle Quadrant as a light twin with prop and mixture controls or a single engine airplane. Most noteworthy, you can remove the unused levers so they’re not in the way, which is very nice.

 

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Trim Wheel

The Bravo Throttle Quadrant includes a trim wheel, hallelujah!!! Pilots from the real world know how important elevator trim is. On the other hand, if you were raised on home flight sims, you possibly underestimate its importance. If you know me, you know how much I liked the Saitek trim wheel. Tragically, it appears that Saitek stopped producing the trim wheel when the company was acquired by Logitech. Now Honeycomb Aeronautical has come to our rescue.

 

Other Features

If the Bravo Throttle Quadrant only had the interchangeable levers and the trim wheel it would be a solid product, but it also includes several other features. It has a landing gear handle with position lights, flap lever and annunciator panel. In addition, it has autopilot controls, and seven programmable rocker switches. Is that too much for a small unit? Is the annunciator panel hard to see? Does it seem like the rocker switches hard to reach? I will suspend judgement until I actually try one in real life.

 

Bravo Throttle Quadrant – Ok, How Much?

Honeycomb Aeronautical’s website lists a suggested retail price of $199.99 for the Bravo Throttle Quadrant. That’s a damn good price for so many features. It should be available “shortly after” the release of the Alpha Flight Controls in the 4th quarter of 2017. In addition, the Bravo Throttle Quadrant looks like it would be a delightful addition to the DIY Deluxe Desktop Flight Sim or the DIY Flight Sim Pod.

 

take my money credit card

DIY Flight Simulator Affiliate Program

DIY Flight Simulator Affiliate Program

Join Us

Do you have a website or blog? If so, you could be a Roger Dodger sales affiliate and earn money through the sale of DIY Flight Sims tutorials. Introducing the DIY Flight Simulator Affiliate Program. I’m looking for new allies and it could be you, especially if your website is about flight simulation, aviation, DIY, or gaming.

If you are a member of a nonprofit group, this could be a great way to raise funds. For example, EAA chapters could benefit from this, or CAP squadrons, JROTC detachments, flying clubs, etc. In addition, online squadrons can use the DIY Flight Simulator Affiliate Program to help pay their hosting expenses.

What are the DIY Flight Sims online courses? Check out all of the online courses here. These are comprehensive tutorials that teach the student how to build a quality flight simulator framework or enclosure with inexpensive building materials. Each course includes video clips, illustrated instructions, diagrams, and printouts. Want to see what my customers are building? Check out the Customer Gallery.

 

DIY Flight Simulator Affiliate Program

It’s easy to join the DIY Flight Simulator Affiliate Program. First of all, simply email me at DIYflightsims@rogerdodger.net and tell me the url of your website or blog. If we are a good match with synergy, then I’ll send you the instructions and html code to get set up. The link on your website will look similar to the picture. If a user clicks the link and then, at some point, enrolls in the course your website will earn a commission.

 

DIY Flight Simulator Affiliate Program
DIY Flight Simulator Affiliate Program

You can earn money with the DIY Flight Simulator Affiliate Program. We can split the revenues 60/40. That is 60% for me and 40% for your website. That is actually very generous because I fronted all the time, money, and effort to create these online courses. I pay affiliates in the month following the sale. It’s easy to start earning revenue with your website.

Send me an email and we can get started today… DIYflightsims@rogerdodger.net

3 Suggestions for your mobile flight simulator

Three Suggestions for Your Mobile Flight Simulator

I was contacted by a representative from a giant, international, airline manufacturer who wanted to build a mobile flight simulator to take to events and schools. You may recall I transported the DIY Triple Screen Flight Sim and the DIY Roll-Away Flight Sim to several events. His team had an empty shell from an actual airplane cockpit, with the real controls, but no instruments or much of anything else. Their task was to make the cockpit shell into a mobile flight simulator. Maybe you have had this idea too.

The first major hurdle was to make the real controls work with the flight simulator software on a PC. And that’s when they contacted me for advice. This is what I told them…

Three Suggestions for Your Mobile Flight Simulator

I have a few suggestions for your team regarding this mobile flight simulator. To start off, I believe many of us in the industry tend to regard a mobile flight simulator on an informal spectrum with “more realistic” on one end and “less realistic” on the other. As I understand your need, you will be transporting this simulator to events, setting it up for use by attendees, and then moving the simulator again. For a mobile flight simulator such as this, I have discovered realism is less important than reliability. It either works on the day of the event or it doesn’t. Therefore, expo simulators fall into a binary, more than a spectrum from an operational standpoint.

So with that in mind, I have three suggestions.

Suggestion #1: Hack Retail Products

The first suggestion is to purchase a retail flight sim control yoke, and hack it. By “hack” I mean you remove the interior components and incorporate them into the airplane cockpit that you showed me in the picture. Everything you need for your mobile flight simulator is inside a retail flight sim yoke. The yoke contains potentiometers that measure pitch and roll deflection, so you can integrate those components into the actual controls on your airplane. The potentiometers are already wired into a circuit board and so is a USB cable. When you plug in the USB cable to a PC, it will simply recognize the controller and install the drivers. You can then use any flight simulator software you want.

You could do the same thing with retail rudder pedals and a throttle quadrant.

Suggestion #2: Use Retail Products

In my experience, it’s a logistical challenge to safely transport and set up a mobile flight simulator. It is possible some part of your simulator may not work correctly even though you were very careful and were prepared for the event. If you can’t get it to work, the whole day is wasted.

My other suggestion is to simply install retail off-the-shelf flight sim controls in your airplane cockpit. This looks decidedly less realistic, but you gain an extra layer of reliability because you can have spare parts in reserve. For example, if the yoke isn’t working on a particular day, you can simply switch it out with a new yoke. The same is true with the rudder pedals and throttle quadrant.

Suggestion #3: Get Running Now, Progress Later

Finally, third option would be to use both strategies. Perhaps you start with Suggestion #2, which is quick and simple, and then maybe a year later move up to Suggestion #1, which is more complex but looks more professional. This approach gets you up and running for early success and also provides a path to improvements. Later, you and your team will have more experience with the flight simulator hardware and software. Therefore, it will be easier for you to re-install the real controls and get them running with the PC. Your team and stakeholders will feel good about the progression of the project.

I hope these suggestions are helpful. I’m interested in knowing how your flight simulator turns out so please let me know what you ultimately decide to do.