I fly the Motion Flight Simulator for Aerofly FS2

Inexpensive Motion Flight Simulator for Aerofly FS2 – and why you’ll never see it again

I designed the DIY Kinetic Motion Flight Sim as a direct-control moving platform. As a result, it works with all flight simulation software. It is the only inexpensive motion flight simulator for Aerofly FS2.

 

Flying around Statue of Liberty in Aerofly FS2
Statue of Liberty in Aerofly FS2 looks magnificent

 

Inexpensive Motion Flight Sims for Everyone

My dream is to create a DIY tutorial that shows how to build a motion flight sim. The most inexpensive way to build a one is to use materials from a home improvement store. As a result, you can build a motion flight sim for just a few hundred dollars instead of a few thousand.

Would the flight sim community embrace such an idea? I posted several demonstration videos to gauge people’s reaction. Unfortunately, when I posted a video to the Aerofly FS2 fan group, I only received negative comments. This makes no sense when you consider how a motion flight simulator for Aerofly FS2 improves the flying experience exponentially.

 

Motion Flight Simulator for Aerofly FS2

Aerofly FS2 is one of the lesser-known flight sim titles, but it has two things that are essential for virtual reality. Namely, high frame rates with dense, quality scenery. Take a look at the embedded video. I’m flying over New York City over hundreds of buildings, yet the frame rates remain smooth.

Next, imagine what it feels like to add a motion flight simulator for Aerofly FS2. The experience is totally immersive. I thought the Aerofly FS2 user base would recognize how this inexpensive DIY project could enhance their flight experience. I guess I was wrong.

 

 

What’s Next

Obviously I won’t be posting any more demonstration videos for Aerofly FS2. However, I’ll gladly continue to use Aerofly FS2 with my motion flight simulator because it’s so enjoyable.

I give extra time and effort to set up the lights, camera, OBS software, etc. when I make a video, and I only want to spend the effort for people that will appreciate my work. It didn’t work out for Aerofly FS2, consequently I will focus on other sim titles like X-Plane 11, DCS World, and IL-2 Battle of Stalingrad.

The Elite Dangerous fans are greatly supportive, so I will post more videos for them also.

Elite Dangerous Motion Flight Simulator

Elite Dangerous Motion Flight Simulator

I built my DIY Elite Dangerous Motion Flight Simulator with supplies from a home improvement store. It works with a variety of flight simulator titles, not just Elite:D. I call this motion rig the “Kinetic Flight Sim.”

How it Moves

I designed the movement system by examining the control linkages of actual Sport Aviation aircraft. Nearly all small airplanes have control systems consisting of cables, pulleys, bell cranks, and levers. The Kinetic Flight Sim uses similar technology.

The motion system is not software-specific. Not only is this an Elite Dangerous Motion Flight Simulator, it will work with any flight simulator software. I’ve already tested it with AeroflyFS2 (see video), War Thunder, and DCS World. I plan to test it with X-plane 11 and IL-2 Battle of Stalingrad once I upgrade the computer’s video card.

 

DIY Elite Dangerous Motion Flight Sim leaving dock
DIY Elite Dangerous Motion Flight Sim leaving dock

 

HOTAS Controls

The Kinetic’s controls are HOTAS (Hands On Throttle And Stick). The joystick is a CH Products Combatstick. I used this type of joystick because I have experience modifying this type and simply because I had one available for use. The throttle is the Saitek/Logitech X52, and the pedals are Saitek Pro Flight rudder pedals. I plan to upgrade to Thrustmaster Warthog controls if I receive adequate funding.

The HOTAS controls are especially important because of virtual reality. When the pilot wears the Oculus Rift VR Headset, he can only see the virtual cockpit. The controls are not visible (and neither is my drink holder).

 

Elite Dangerous Motion Flight Sim at a space station
Elite Dangerous Motion Flight Sim at a space station

 

Elite Dangerous Motion Flight Simulator

Check out these demonstration videos. I’m using the Kinetic flight sim with Elite Dangerous and flying the new Krait MkII. Elite:D works particularly well with my gaming computer and VR headset. It’s an absolute joy to fly in space with a motion flight sim. I could produce longer videos but I’m not sure if people really want to see that.

Should I livestream longer flights? I hope to try that soon.

 

 

The following video is an exclusive! It’s only available to the readers of this blog article. I call it “Dodging Icebergs”  Enjoy ! ! !

 

 

Warm Fireplace Inside a Flight Simulator

This project combines two of my favorite things: a cozy fireplace and my flight simulator. Why not simulate a nice cozy fireplace inside a flight simulator?!

This DIY flight sim is ready for winter! I combined the warm atmosphere of a crackling fireplace with the fun of flying my simulator. It’s just the thing for those freezing winter months. You can do this too, it’s easy to set up.

Create a Fireplace Inside a Flight Simulator

My flight simulator has two displays connected to the graphics card. The large display is a 40″ HDTV and the smaller display is a 19″ VGA computer monitor. Typically, I display the flight simulator outside view on the large screen and the flight instruments on the smaller screen. For today’s project, I’m only running FSX on the large screen. Start FSX and start a flight. Select Windowed Mode from the View Menu and resize the window so it fits on one screen (the large screen in my example).

Next start a web browser on the second monitor and find a fireplace video on YouTube. Play the video and select full screen. This is how I my smaller display shows a cozy, crackling fireplace.

The flight simulator you see in the pictures and video is the DIY Flight Sim Pod. You can build this same thing in your own home. These instructional videos and manuals show you how to build a big, beautiful, flight simulator. The yoke, throttle quadrant, switch panels, etc. all came from Amazon.

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Don’t Fly Thirsty

All we need now is a nice hot apple cider. I recently discovered sugar free apple cider from Alpine. It doesn’t need any sugar because of what we add next: cinnamon flavored bourbon. Apple and cinnamon… oh it’s so, so good!
Leave the ice and snow outside, you’re flying in comfort.
Happy Landings!

Warm fireplace in your Flight Sim!
Warm fireplace in your Flight Sim!

Prepar3D with Triple Screens and More

What you’re seeing here is Lockheed Martin Prepar3D with triple screens and more. The software is Prepar3D version 3.4, the DIY Deluxe Desktop Flight Sim, the DIY Side Joystick Frame, Air Manager is running the instruments on the 4th display. The installation of P3D was straightforward and you’re looking at a stock installation with no add-ons (yet).

 

 

The three main displays are inexpensive 32″ HDTVs connected to a single Nvidia GeForce mid-level graphics card. The system specs are at the end of this blog post.

Prepar3D Installation

P3D recognized the Saitek X52 Pro and properly assigned its functions, which was very nice. For other flight simulator programs, assigning the controls correctly is an awful awful chore, but not for P3D. This is the first flight simulator software I’ve ever seen that correctly identified rudder pedals and successfully assigned them to the correct function. Including the toe brakes. So, kudos to Lockheed Martin. They also build spaceships, by the way. Just so you know.

It’s easy to combine the DIY Side Joystick Frame, (item 311), with the Deluxe Desktop Flight Sim project. I’m using the Saitek Pro Flight Cessna rudder pedals. Great rudder pedals. I updated the drivers for my Saitek switch panels that enabled them to work with P3D. That was easy.

You’ll notice that nothing here is expensive or exotic… or even new. For example, I’m using a second-hand computer to display the flight instruments. The second computer is so old it’s running Windows Vista.

Air Manager is the software that generates the flight instruments and it communicates through the local network connection with P3D on my primary computer. Air Manager also works with X-plane and Flight Simulator X.

System Specifications

DIY Deluxe Desktop Flight Sim, item #D250
DIY Side Joystick Frame, item #F311
Primary computer: Powerspec B634 with Intel i5-3450
Nvidia GeForce GTX 950 SSC
Windows 7, 64 bit
Saitek X52 Pro Flight HOTAS controls
Saitek Pro Flight Cessna rudder pedals

Secondary computer: Dell Inspiron 530s with Pentum E2200
Windows Vista

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Prepar3D with triple screens and more
Prepar3D with triple screens and more

DIY Flight Sim Pod Final Assembly

DIY Flight Sim Pod Final Assembly

DIY Flight Sim Pod Final Assembly Video Transcript

This is an excerpt from the DIY Flight Sim Pod instructional video. The video and associated manual show you every step in building this home flight simulator project.

In this final section, we’re going to populate the Inner Frame with computer hardware. Furthermore, we will assemble all the pieces of the Flight Sim Pod. Your new flight simulator will soon be finished!

We see here the Inner Frame, all painted and masking tape removed, lt’s look at the right side of the frame. Here on the Computer Shelf we can set a desktop computer, and a powerstrip on the Top Shelf.

Next: the monitor or HDTV. It is a very good idea to get help from a friend while mounting the HDTV. You can’t actually see the bracket when you clip onto it, so it helps to have a second pair of eyes watching. Make sure it’s centered in the frame also.

Install the switch panels and then add the yoke, and beside the yoke, the throttle quadrant. I have attached Velcro to the top of the throttle quadrant for the trackball mouse. There is enough room on the yoke housing for a mini-keyboard, or it can go beside the yoke. Don’t forget a drink holder!

Attach the rudder pedals, and add the speakers. Remember the Chair Staytheres? I painted these also. They have Velcro that loops over this horizontal bar. Notice when you use the Chair Staythere you have to reach way down to get it and you might want an easier way. I simply measured 7” from the end of the pipe and drilled two holes and then I tied on a piece of boot string and hung it from the pipe above. I did this on both sides.

Now I don’t have to reach down so far. With all the peripheral equipment on this machine, we end up with a lot of wires. I loop the wires and use strips of Velcro to keep them organized. If I need a USB extension, I use Velcro straps to help keep it secure. Use it for the rudder pedals so the wire won’t get tangled up with your feet. I secured the USB hubs with Velcro too. I recommend labeling the USB wires, there are so many of them

Once everything is hooked up, it’s time for a test drive! Make sure all the peripherals work correctly.

We’re almost finished with the DIY Flight Sim Pod Final Assembly. For the final step, I really recommend you get help from a friend because you’ll need someone to hold the Side Wall in place while you attach it to the three interface points. The first point is near the Side Boards. There are two points in the front that slide into place also

Secure each interface point with a self-drilling screw. That Side Wall will stand by itself so you can attach the other Side Wall. Attach all three interface points with self-drilling screws. Next replace this bottom support pipe, or the tail end extension, your choice. Secure with self-drilling screws.

Carry in the Top Canopy, and set the 1×4 board on the ledge near the top of the support pillars. Have your partner hold the back of the Top Canopy while you attach the front. Once the front two corners are in, you can attach one of the back corners. Secure the front two corners with self-drilling screws.

Now we can attach the top support pipe. First insert it in the left side. Remember, we left the right side of the Top Canopy loose for this reason. Attach both pipes simultaneously. Attach four self-drilling screws: The two back corners of the Top Canopy, and both sides of the top support pipe.

You can build your own DIY Flight Sim Pod with this instructional video and manual

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man and woman attach side wall
DIY Flight Sim Pod final assembly

Fly to the Secret Base in FSX

The FSX Secret Base and the surrounding islands are featured in the second half of the Tokyo Executive Transport mission. The islands only appear during that mission so if you try to fly there during free flight, you will find only empty ocean. Try flying the mission. Sure, you get to see the islands and the Secret Base in FSX, but you have to fly the assigned Lear jet.

So how do you fly to the Secret Islands in free flight? How do you fly your choice of aircraft? You noticed in the video I was flying the Robinson R22. If you want to do something similar, you should add the Secret Islands as a scenery object. Fortunately, this is very easy.

Add the Secret Base in FSX

Add the Secret Islands (including the Base) as a scenery object in FSX. Check out this link: this is a freeware FSX scenery download that installs the Secret Base as a regular scenery object. Don’t forget to read the Read Me file.

The file installs the Secret Islands, the Secret Base, death ray guns on the mountain peaks, and some sort of suspicious weather station on the top of the highest mountain. The only object that is not included is the retractable water runway that leads to the hangar. The runway is present during the Tokyo mission, but not when you fly to the Secret Islands in free flight.

Air Manager

I use Air Manager software from Sim Innovations in the embedded video. This is a clever piece of software that makes it easy to display instruments on a separate monitor. I’m using it for the Robinson R22, but it works for a variety of default and add-on aircraft. Use it in FSX, FSX Steam, Prepar3D and X-Plane. Air Manager features over 300 flight instruments to choose from and more on the way.

approaching Secret Base in FSX
Secret Base in FSX

 

Cats in Space

I unexpectedly adopted a cat when my mom moved to a new apartment and discovered she couldn’t have pets. Then I realized something amazing: I’ve been making YouTube videos for 10 years and I’ve never uploaded a video with a cat. I can now do cat videos! I had dreams of my cat earning enough money in ad revenue to pay for her own food, litter, and vet bills. Look at this video, she even hops onto the back of my chair and flies through space with me…. how cute is that?
 

 

I guess it’s not that interesting to people. Literally zero people care.

So I guess I’ll have to eat her.